2020-2021 Center for Jewish History Fellowship Program

Fellowship awards at the Center for Jewish History support cutting-edge research in the rich collections of the Center's partners - American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. More than 150 humanities scholars at various stages of their careers and research projects have taken up residence at the Center and profited from opportunities to share their work with leading scholars in their fields. Support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and other funders has been critical in helping to build an interdisciplinary community of scholars.

While in residence at the Center on year-long or short-term fellowships, fellows are invited to participate in a vibrant academic community that engages students and scholars from North America, Europe, and Israel and creates space of intellectual exchanges and public scholarship. Comprised of 16 leading scholars in Jewish Studies, the Center's Academic Advisory Council provides oversight and offers an additional professional resource to fellows. Fellows are additionally invited to take part in regularly scheduled Scholars Working Groups that bring together expert faculty to discuss new Jewish Studies research.

For a complete list of available fellowship programs, please click below to view descriptions and application guidelines. Questions about the fellowship program may be directed to Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Director of Academic Programs.

Available Fellowships

  • NEH Scholar in Residence

    The application deadline for the NEH Scholar in Residence starting in Fall 2021 is December 1, 2020.

    Through the generous support of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) the Center for Jewish History (the Center) invites applications for an NEH Scholar in Residence that will support original research conducted at the Center.  Applications are welcome from scholars working in a broad range of fields within the humanities and social sciences. The application deadline is December 1, 2020 for a residency beginning in September 2021.

    Applications are welcome from scholars in any field who have completed a PhD more than six years prior to the start of the fellowship and whose research will benefit considerably from consultation with materials in the collections of the Center’s partners – American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

    Fellowships carry a stipend of $60,000 for a period of 12 months. Fellows are expected to conduct original research at the Center, deliver at least one public program based on the research conducted, actively participate in the scholarly community at the Center, and be a mentor to the graduate student and postdoctoral fellows also in residence.  Fellows must acknowledge the Center and the National Endowment for the Humanities in all publications resulting from research completed during the fellowship, and submit a report upon completion of the fellowship describing the experience.

    Download the Application Guidelines

    Assessment Criteria

    • The ambition, scope, and intellectual significance of the proposed project.
    • The quality and impact of the applicant’s prior work in their respective field.
    • The overall clarity and intelligibility of the proposal, with its aims clearly conveyed.
    • The feasibility and appropriateness of the project proposal, including the applicant’s disciplinary and linguistic training and, when relevant, the soundness of the dissemination and access plans.
    • The likelihood that the applicant will become part of the life of the Center for Jewish History for the time of the fellowship, by using its collections for the proposed project and participating in Center events.

    The NEH Scholar in Residence will join a larger cohort of long- and short-term fellows within the Center’s Fellowship Program. The Center seeks to build a fellowship cohort that is diverse in race, ethnicity, and gender as well as academic rank, geographic location, and field of study. Qualified individuals who would bring diverse perspectives and experiences to the fellowship are especially encouraged to apply.

    Requirements for Application

    • Cover letter stating area of interest, how the project relates to the mission of the Center for Jewish History, and how the project will benefit from the residency (no more than one page);
    • Curriculum Vitae;
    • Research proposal (no more than 1500 words), including specific reference to the collections at the Center and clearly stated goals for research during the period of the fellowship;
    • A one-page bibliography of important secondary sources for the project;
    • Contact information for three references, who can speak to the significance of the candidate’s work.

    Please submit your application materials by email as one continuous PDF file by December 1, 2020 to:

    Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Ph.D.
    Director of Academic Programs
    Center for Jewish History
    15 West 16th Street
    New York, NY 10011
    United States of America
    Email: fellowships@cjh.org

  • Graduate Research Fellowship

    The application deadline for Graduate Research Fellowships starting in Fall 2020 is December 20, 2019.

    The Center for Jewish History offers ten-month fellowships to doctoral candidates to support original research using the collections of the Center’s partners - American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Preference is given to those candidates who draw on the library and archival resources of more than one partner institution. Fellows must be in residence at the Center from September 2020 through June 2021 and applicants should have completed all requirements (i.e., coursework, exams, dissertation proposal) for the doctoral degree except for the dissertation. It is required that each fellow spend a minimum of three days per week in residence in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room using the archival and library resources. Fellows must also participate in the Center for Jewish History Fellowship Seminar Program, attend bi-weekly meetings of the fellowship program cohort, deliver a minimum of one lecture based on research conducted at Center, and submit a report upon completion of the Fellowship describing her/his experience as a Center Fellow. Fellowships carry a stipend of $22,500 for a period of one academic year.

    Download the Application Guidelines

    Eligibility

    • The fellowship is open to qualified doctoral candidates from accredited domestic and international institutions.
    • Fellows must be in residence at the Center from the beginning of September 2020 until the end of June 2021.
    • Applicants should have completed all requirements (i.e. coursework, exams, dissertation proposal) for the doctoral degree except for the dissertation.
    • Fellows will be permitted to hold a concurrent fellowship provided that it does not contain any residency requirement or interfere in any way with full participation in the activities described above. Please consult the Director of Academic Programs before accepting any additional fellowships, academic or other positions to be held during the term of the CJH fellowship.
    • For non-U.S. citizens, it is the responsibility of the applicant to have the appropriate visa for acceptance of the award during the ten-month fellowship term. The Center for Jewish History is not a visa-granting institution.

    Requirements for Application

    • Register at www.cjh.org/gradregistration
    • Cover letter stating area of interest, knowledge of relevant languages, and how the project relates to the general mission of the Center for Jewish History
    • Curriculum Vitae, including contact information, education, publications, scholarly and/or museum activities, teaching experience, and any other relevant work experience
    • Research proposal of no more than four pages double-spaced, including specific reference to the collections at the Center and clearly stated goals for research during the period of the fellowship
    • A one-page bibliography of important secondary sources for the project
    • Graduate school transcript
    • Three letters of recommendation, which address the significance of the candidate’s work for his or her field, as well as the candidate’s ability to fulfill the proposed work. Please ensure that your application indicates the names and contact information of those writing letters of recommendation on your behalf.
    • Letters of recommendation should be sent separately, directly by the recommenders – preferably by email or dossier service – to the address below.
    • Please submit application materials 2-6 by email. Transcripts may arrive separately to the below address or email address.

    The schedule for the application process is as follows:

    • All application materials, including letters of recommendation, must be received by December 20, 2019 for consideration.
    • Announcement of grant recipients by February 2020
    • Commencement of grant period, September 1, 2020
    • Conclusion of grant period, June 30, 2021

    Applications are to be submitted to:

    Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Ph.D.
    Director of Academic Programs
    Center for Jewish History
    15 West 16th Street
    New York, NY 10011
    United States of America
    Email: fellowships@cjh.org

  • CJH-Fordham University Research Fellowship

    The application deadline for the CJH-Fordham University Research Fellowship is February 1, 2020.

    Fordham University's Center for Jewish Studies and the Center for Jewish History offer a joint short-term research fellowship in Jewish Studies for scholars outside the New York City metropolitan area whose research focuses on Jewish-Christian relations and who wish to conduct research based on materials housed at the Center for Jewish History and Fordham University.

    The fellow is expected to spend at least a month at the two host institutions, but may stay as long as five months. The fellow's stay must coincide with either the fall or spring Fordham University academic semesters. The stipend for this fellowship is $5,000.

    The fellow will receive affiliation with Fordham University, and will be required to offer a faculty seminar, and a public lecture, which would be a joint event of Fordham and CJH with alternate venues. The fellow is also expected to participate in scholarly seminars and other meetings at the Center for Jewish History and Fordham University.

    The CJH-Fordham Research Fellowship in Jewish-Christian Relations is made possible by funds from the Center for Jewish History, the Eugene Shvidler Gift Fund at Fordham University, and additional gift funds to Jewish Studies at Fordham University.

    Download the Application Guidelines


    Applications are to be submitted to:

    Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Ph.D.
    Director of Academic Programs
    Center for Jewish History
    15 West 16th Street
    New York, NY 10011
    United States of America
    Email: fellowships@cjh.org

  • Spring 2020 Teaching Fellowship

    The Center for Jewish History offers a Spring 2020 Teaching Fellowship for scholars/educators to prepare and present primary sources-based workshops to college and high school students, drawing from the collections of the Center’s partner institutions: The American Jewish Historical Society, The American Sephardi Federation, The Leo Baeck Institute, The Yeshiva University Museum, and The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. The stipend for the teaching fellowship is $8,000.

    The Center has been developing educational workshops with primary sources for both high schools and universities – customized in response to specific educational and/or thematic requests from the faculty and students’ needs. Examples of our workshops in the fall semester include Antisemitism in the 1930s, Introduction to Research Methods, Europe at the Turn of 20th Century, Art and Social Movements, Issues of Immigration in the 19th and 20th Centuries, Jews in 19th Century America, Fashion Designers’ Creative Process, etc.

    Workshops usually take between 60 and 90 minutes, and their formula includes student small-group hands-on activities with primary sources based on a worksheet, followed by short presentations student groups, facilitated by the Center’s educator.

    The Teaching Fellow is expected to spend up to 10 hours a week at the Center during the spring semester (February 10-June 30), researching materials to be used in an educational context in response to the needs and requests of various groups, selecting primary sources and preparing worksheets (in collaboration with the Center’s educator), and leading workshops at the Center.

    The Fellow will be encouraged to use the time at the Center as a research/learning project and will be provided with mentorship and intellectual support.

    Download the Application Guidelines

    Eligibility

    • Open to scholars/educators with teaching experience in university and/or high school settings: part-time faculty, adjuncts, Ph.D. students with more than 4 semesters of teaching experience, high school educators
    • Applicants cannot be teaching more than one course at a home institution during the period of the fellowship

    Requirements for Application

    • Cover letter stating area of interest, experience in education, and how the Teaching Fellowship fulfills the applicant’s personal research/learning goals
    • Teaching philosophy (max. 400 words)
    • Resume, stating clearly courses/classes/workshops taught (both in school and after-school settings)
    • Sample of student evaluations (at least one course or at least ten evaluation comments)
    • Please submit your application materials by email as one continuous PDF file

    The schedule for the application process is as follows:

    • All application materials must be received by January 24, 2020
    • Interviews (in person or via zoom) will be held promptly, starting January 27, 2020
    • Commencement of fellowship period, February 10, 2020
    • Conclusion of fellowship period, June 30, 2020

    Applications are to be submitted to:

    Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Ph.D.
    Director of Academic Programs
    Center for Jewish History
    15 West 16th Street
    New York, NY 10011
    United States of America
    Email: fellowships@cjh.org

  • Short-term Research Fellowships

    The Center for Jewish History offers three short-term research fellowships for scholars outside the New York City metropolitan area who wish to conduct research based on the collections of the Center’s partner institutions: American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Priority will be given to projects drawing from collections of more than one partner institution.

    The fellow is expected to spend at least three months at the Center between May 1, 2020 and May 31,2021. If summer months are considered, the fellow's stay must cover at least one month of an academic semester (e.g. May-July, August-October, December-February, etc). The stipend for the short-term fellowships is $6,500.

    The fellow is expected to spend at least three days a week at the Center and participate in scholarly seminars and other meetings at the Center for Jewish History. The fellow is also required to deliver a talk presenting their research project and to submit a short final report regarding their time at the Center.

    Download the Application Guidelines

    Eligibility

    • Open to scholars from outside the New York metropolitan area engaged in advanced doctoral and post-doctoral research.
    • Doctoral students applying for the fellowship must have all the program requirements completed by the time of application. Independent scholars must have Ph.D. degrees.
    • For non-U.S. citizens, it is the responsibility of the applicant to have the appropriate visa for acceptance of the award during the three-month fellowship term. The Center for Jewish History is not a visa-granting institution.

    Requirements for Application

    • Cover letter stating area of interest, knowledge of relevant languages, and how the project relates to the collections at the Center for Jewish History.
    • Curriculum Vitae, including contact information, education, publications, scholarly and/or museum activities, teaching experience, and any other relevant work experience.
    • Research proposal of no more than four pages double-spaced, including specific reference to the collections at the Center, and clearly stated goals for research during the period of the fellowship.
    • A one-page bibliography of important secondary sources for the project.
    • One letter of recommendation, which addresses the significance of the candidate’s work for their field, as well as the candidate’s ability to fulfill the proposed work. Letter of recommendation should be sent under separate cover – preferably by email or dossier service – to the address below.
    • Please submit application materials by email as one continuous PDF file.

    The schedule for the application process is as follows:

    • All application materials, including the letter of recommendation, must be received by January 31, 2020 for consideration.
    • Announcement of fellowship recipients by March 1, 2020
    • Commencement of fellowship period, May 1, 2020
    • Conclusion of grant period, May 31, 2021

    Applications are to be submitted to:

    Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Ph.D.
    Director of Academic Programs
    Center for Jewish History
    15 West 16th Street
    New York, NY 10011
    United States of America
    Email: fellowships@cjh.org

  • Sid Lapidus Curatorial Fellowship

    The Center for Jewish History is delighted to announce the Sid Lapidus Curatorial Fellowship — a new, three-month fellowship for curators to support their original research and conceptualization of exhibition projects that draw from the collections of the Center’s partner institutions: American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

    The fellows will be able to consult the collections a) to inform and shape their new or in-process exhibition projects; b) to further contextualize in-process exhibitions with primary sources from the collections ; and c) to present and reference the collections in exhibition catalogues and accompanying materials, including digital components of exhibitions.

    Please note that the conditions of usage and loans of any objects would be subject to separate agreements negotiated directly with the Center’s partner institutions.

    Fellows must be in residence at the Center for a period of three consecutive months, chosen between May and December of 2020, with at least one month falling during the academic year (i.e. May or September).

    During their residency, fellows will deliver at least one Master Class/workshop to students of curatorial studies. They are also expected to deliver a presentation about the project of their choice to a broader audience. The fellowship will conclude with a report on the fellow’s activity (an exhibition proposal and/or conceptualization of use of the collections in proposed exhibitions).

    The successful applicants for the fellowship are late-junior to mid-career curators with experience in curating shows at diverse venues, such as museums and/or galleries, for at least 3 years. In reviewing the portfolio of exhibitions, preference will be given to those candidates whose projects are formally and/or conceptually interdisciplinary. Fellowships carry a stipend of $10,000 for a period of 3 months.

    Download the Application Guidelines

    Eligibility

    • The fellowship is open to late-junior or mid-career curators, with at least three years of curatorial experience (including at least 2 projects complete as a curator) ·
    • Fellows must be in residence at the Center for three months between May and December 2020 (with at least one month falling during the semester — May or September).
    • Preference is given to those candidates who consider using archival resources of more than one partner institution and who can secure a venue for their exhibition proposal.
    • For non-U.S. citizens, it is the responsibility of the applicant to have the appropriate visa for acceptance of the award during the three-month fellowship term. The Center for Jewish History is not a visa-granting institution.


    Requirements for Application

    • Cover letter
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • A portfolio of curated projects, including installation shots, submitted either as a PDF file (no more than five pages of images with brief descriptions), or a weblink with clear indications of which projects should be considered
    • Project proposal of no more than five pages, including specific reference to the collections at the Center and clearly stated goals for research during the period of the fellowship
    • One letter of recommendation, which addresses the significance of the candidate's work to their field
    • Preferred, but not required: a letter of interest from a potential collaborating venue
    • Please submit application as one combined file, in PDF format (if providing links to website regarding a portfolio, please provide them in your application). No links to Dropbox/Google documents will be accepted.

    The schedule for the application process is as follows:

    • All application materials must be submitted by January 31, 2020
    • Announcement of fellowship recipients: March 1, 2020
    • Conclusion of the fellowship period: May 31, 2021

    Applications are to be submitted to:

    Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Ph.D.
    Director of Academic Programs
    Center for Jewish History
    15 West 16th Street
    New York, NY 10011
    United States of America
    Email: fellowships@cjh.org

  • Visiting Scholars Program

    The Center for Jewish History's Visiting Scholar Program invites scholars who have completed their doctorate or its equivalent to apply for an affiliation with the Center and to work in the collections of one or more of its partner institutions: American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. For their period of affiliation, Visiting Scholars will receive workspace at the Center and access to the collections housed at the Center for Jewish History. The Visiting Scholar Program does not provide a stipend or financial support.

    Visiting Scholars will be expected to commit to a regular presence at the Center for a minimum of three months, working at the Center at least two days per week. Visiting Scholars are expected to play an active role in the Center's Fellowship Program activities by attending meetings with other fellows and either presenting an academic seminar on their work or participating in a public program. Scholars may apply to be affiliated with the Center for a full academic year (September - May), the fall semester (September - December) or spring semester (mid-January - May), or for the summer (June - August).

    Junior and senior scholars, including those who are on leave from their home institutions, are encouraged to apply, as are independent scholars and scholars who are between academic appointments.

    Download the Application Guidelines

    Eligibility

    • Scholars holding a PhD or equivalent terminal degree
    • Scholars working on projects that make use of the Center partner collections
    • Scholars eager to participate in the Center's active community of researchers

    Requirements for Application

    • A complete curriculum vitae
    • A description of the proposed research project, maximum 3 pages in length, including an explanation of which of the Center partners' collections will be used
    • The names and contact information of two references
    • Please send all application materials together electronically as one continuous PDF document.

    Applications are to be submitted to:

    Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Ph.D.
    Director of Academic Programs
    Center for Jewish History
    15 West 16th Street
    New York, NY 10011
    United States of America
    Email: fellowships@cjh.org

  • Vivian J. Prins Foundation Artistic Residency

    The Center for Jewish History is happy to announce the Vivian J. Prins Foundation Artistic Residency — a new, three-month residency for non-US artists to support their original research and conceptualization of their projects that draw from the collections of the Center’s partner institutions: American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

    We invite non-US artists whose artistic practice is research-informed, including, but not limited to the ideas around archives, gender, migration and displacement, and changemaking.

    Artist must be in residence at the Center for a period of three consecutive months, chosen between May 1, 2020 and May 31, 2021, with at least one month falling during the academic year (i.e., May or September).

    During their residency, artist will deliver at least one Master Class/workshop open to students of New York universities. The residency will conclude with an intervention, open to the public.

    The successful applicants for the residency are junior to mid-career artists who are not US citizens, whose practice is research-informed. In reviewing the portfolio of artists, preference will be given to those candidates whose projects are formally and/or conceptually interdisciplinary. 

    Fellowships carry a stipend of $7,000 for a period of 3 months.

    Eligibility

    • The residency is open to junior or mid-career artists who are not US citizens.
    • Artist must be in residence at the Center for three months between May and December 2020 (with at least one month falling during the academic year — May or September).
    • Preference is given to those candidates who consider using archival resources of more than one partner institution and who can secure a venue for their exhibition proposal.

    Requirements for Application

    • Cover letter
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • A portfolio of projects, including installation shots, submitted either as a PDF file (no more than five pages of images with brief descriptions), or a weblink with clear indications of which projects should be considered.
    • Project proposal of no more than three pages, including reference to the collections at the Center and general goals for research during the period of the residency.
    • Please submit application as one combined file, in PDF format (if providing links to website regarding a portfolio, please provide them in your application). No links to Dropbox/Google documents will be accepted.

    The schedule for the application process is as follows:

    • All application materials must be submitted by January 31, 2020
    • Announcement of fellowship recipients: March 1, 2020
    • Conclusion of the fellowship period: May 31, 2021

    Applications are to be submitted to:

    Malgorzata Bakalarz-Duverger, Ph.D.
    Director of Academic Programs
    Center for Jewish History
    15 West 16th Street
    New York, NY 10011
    United States of America
    Email: fellowships@cjh.org

Center for Jewish History Fellows

The Center for Jewish History welcomes a new cohort of outstanding fellows to spend the 2021-22 academic year engaged in their cutting-edge research. They will be working with the Center's Partners' archives on their original projects. Varying in their disciplinary and chronological scope, the fellows’ scholarship weaves a fascinating and complex picture of the field of Jewish studies today.

Each year the Center for Jewish History hosts a cohort of scholars as well as a distinguished senior scholar.

Jeffrey Shandler, 2021-22 NEH Scholar-in-Residence
Distinguished Professor of Jewish Studies
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
Fields: Jewish memory practices, Jewish cultural history, intellectual history of Jewish Studies, digital humanities in Jewish Studies, Yiddish language, literature and culture

Project: Jewish Museums Lost and Found
Lost Jewish museums include institutions shut down because of political upheavalsmost notoriously, the dismantling of museums in European cities under Nazi control—as well as the relocation, dispersal, or reconstitution of Judaica collections, plus the planning of Jewish museums that were never realized. Shandler’s interest in lost museums responds to recent developments involving museums generally. Beginning in spring 2020, museums around the world were closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and questions remain as to their future. In an unexpected way, the closing of museums foregrounds questions central to his research: What role do museums play in Jewish life today? What practices have museums instituted that have become part of contemporary Jewish culture? 

Joining Jeffrey Shandler will be doctoral students pursuing diverse research in Jewish studies:

  • Oskar Czendze, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Aleksandra Jakubczak, Columbia University
  • Susanne Heim, University of Freiburg
  • Carla Veira, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa
  • David Walsh, Princeton University
  • Anne Blankenship, North Dakota State University
  • Karen Stern, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
  • Zuzanna Hertzberg, Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw, Poland

Oskar Czendze, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Graduate Fellow
Field/s: Eastern and Central European history, U.S. history, Jewish studies
Topic: From Loss to Invention: Galician Jews Between New York and East Central Europe, 1890-1938

This project is a transnational history of the American immigrant experiences of Galician Jews between the start of the mass migration from Galicia in the 1890s until the outbreak of the Second World War. Specifically, it analyzes how Jews produced, used, and mobilized the cultural label of the Galitzyaner within the Lower East Side, examining the everyday life of Jewish immigrants, their institutions, newspapers, music, personal writings, and tourism activities to interwar Poland. It seeks to answer the question of how Jewish immigrants transformed the concept of Galicia from a real, geographic place in which they once resided, to an imaginary homeland in their mindset. What does the memory of an East‑Central European region tell us about the relation between home and exile, belonging and place in modern Jewish culture?

Aleksandra Jakubczak, Columbia University

Graduate Fellow
Field/s: Modern history, gender studies, Eastern European history, Jewish studies
Topic: “Protecting the Jewish Daughters;” Sex Work, Mobility, and Gender Geographies of Power between the 1870s and 1930s

This project examines significant questions about Jewish urbanization and international migrations through the lens of gender. Analyzing activity and migration of prostitutes, it argues that the extraordinary physical mobility of independent Jewish women was a major factor behind the unsettled gender relations withing Jewish society in Eastern Europe and abroad. The project seeks to understand the ways in which urbanization of the Jewish population affected the Jewish women who migrated to the large urban centers of Eastern Europe and engaged in the labor market. More specifically, it explores how these urbanizing processes altered the gender order of Jewish society in Eastern Europe by shaping conflicting ideas of new and modern Jewish women. Finally, the project argues that, as in the case of the garment industry, Jewish female migrants were able to transplant their experiences in the sex industry from Europe abroad.

Anne Blankenship, Associate Professor, North Dakota State University

CJH-Fordham University Fellow
Field/s: Religious studies
Topic: Race, Religion, and Immigration: How Jews, Catholics, and Protestants Faced Mass Immigration, 1882-1924

Susanne Heim, Independent Scholar, Executive Editor of The Persecution and Murder of European Jews by Nazi Germany 1933-45, edited on behalf of the German Federal Archives, the Institute for Contemporary History Munich-Berlin, and the Chair for Modern History at the Albert Ludwig

Field/s: History, Holocaust studies, social studies
Topic: Jewish Refugees from Nazi Germany and International Migrations Management

Zuzanna Hertzberg, Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw, Poland

Vivian J. Prins Artistic Residency
Field/s: Arts
Topic: Mechitza - Herstory

Karen Stern, Associate Professor, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

Sid Lapidus Curatorial Fellow
Field/s: History
Topic: Jewish Graffiti: Hidden Histories

Carla Veira, Senior Researcher at the Centre for the Humanities, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa

Field/s: Early modern history
Topic: Portuguese Jews and Iberian-North American Trade Relations in Colonial Times: The Case of Aaron Lopez (1731-1782)

David Walsh, Princeton University

Field/s: History
Topic: No Enemies to the Right: The Far Right, the Conservative Movement, and the Right-Wing Popular Front